Ullr

Well do to popular demand, it is time to learn about Ullr! Now, bear with me here for I know absolutely nothing about Ullr. How does that affect this post? Well most of the information will come from outside sources. There may be a comment from me here and there, but as I said, I do not know anything about Ullr, so we shall see how it goes!

 

"Ullr is a very old god of the northern lands, so old that by the time the Iron Age Norse myths were written down, not much more was known about him except that he was a god of archery, hunting, and the winter. His name occurs so frequently as part of Scandinavian place-names that he must have been a much more important deity at one time. He was shown frequently with skates or skis on his feet, and because of this he has been hailed as the modern God of Skiing. One story talks about him "crossing water on a magic bone", alluding to crossing the frozen ice on skates.

 

He was also called God of the Shield, and the shield was referred to as his "ship", which may be a reference to using a shield or shield-shaped board as a sled … or to the ice of winter enveloping the world like a shield. Ullr's name comes from wuldor, an Old High German word meaning "glory". It was pronounced "Ool" in ancient times, but today is generally pronounced "Ooler". The Anglo-Saxons called him Vulder; in some places in Germany he was known as Holler and said to be the husband of the

 

 

Germanic goddess Holda. Some modern Pagans feel that he eventually took up with Skadi, the winter goddess and huntress, after she left her first husband Njord.

 

Ullr was said to be the son of Sif and the stepson of Thor. Some claim that he was the son of Egill/Aurvandil, the great archer who was Thor's hunting companion and the father of Svipdag as well. Some see him as Aesir because of his mother and stepfather; some as Vanir because of his food-procuring hunter's nature. He lived in Ydalir, the Yew-grove, referring to the fact that yew wood was the favorite for making bows even thousands of years ago. In Saxo Grammaticus's works, where the Gods are recast as human heroes, Odin is temporarily exiled for rape and Ullr is chosen to lead in his place until Odin's return, which is an echo of his former importance to the people of the North.

In Lilla Ullevi, Sweden, an actual shrine to Ullr was unearthed. In the earth around it were found 65 rings; old references to swearing on Ullr's ring indicate that he was one of the Gods who watched over a vow. The rings were apparently used for swearing oaths and then buried at his shrine." (1)

 

Ullr it seams, is the lord of winter, the snow king. It is wise to pray to him, and give him an offering when Skiing, or hiking in the snow. Hopefully, he shall guard and guild you.

 

"Ull, Old Norse Ullr,  in Norse mythology, the god of snowshoes, hunting, the bow, and the shield; he was a handsome stepson of the thunder god Thor. Ull possessed warrior-like attributes and was called upon for aid in individual combat. He resided at Ydalir (Yew Dales).

Although not much has been recorded about Ull, he must have been a very prominent deity in the Norse pantheon at one time because, according to one tradition, the god Odin offered Ull’s favours as a reward to the one who would aid him. In addition, Ull’s name appears as part of many Swedish and Norwegian place-names. In the chronicles of the Danish historian Saxo Grammaticus, Ollerus is the equivalent of Ull." (2)

 

"In early Germanic paganism, *Wulþuz ("glory"; Old Norse Ullr) appears to have been a major god, or an epithet of an important god, in prehistoric times. The term wolþu-"glory", possibly in reference to the god, is attested on the 3rd century Thorsberg chape (as owlþu-), but medieval Icelandic sources have only sparse material on Old Norse Ullr.

 

The Old English cognate wuldor means "glory" but is not used as a proper name, although it figures frequently in kennings for the Christian God such as wuldres cyning "king of glory", wuldorfæder "glory-father" or wuldor alwealda "glorious all-ruler".

The medieval Norse word was Latinized as Ollerus. The Modern Icelandic form is Ullur. In the mainland Scandinavian languages the modern form is Ull. For decades and originating from within the winter skiing community of Europe, the Scandinavian god "Ullr" is considered the Guardian Patron Saint of Skiers (GermanSchutzpatron der Skifahrer). An Ullr medallion or Ullr ski medal, depicting the Scandinavian god Ullr on skis holding a bow and arrow, is widely worn as a talisman by skiers in Europe and elsewhere. In Norse mythology, Ullr also spelled Ull, a hunter god, was considered a superb archer and skier, and was the god to invoke when engaging in single combat, his favourite sport, however, was chasing game with a bow and arrow through the mountains at speed on skis.[1]" (3)

 

 

Well, that about does it for Ullr! I hope you learned something! I did!

 

 

Hail Ullr!

 

 

Sources:

1: http://www.northernpaganism.org/shrines/ullrs-shrine/about.html

2:http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/613227/Ull

3:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ullr

 

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